Two Of The Fastest U.S. Military Cargo Ships Stuck In Baltimore After Francis Scott Key Bridge Collapse

SS Denebola
Image Credits: Wikipedia

Two of the most advanced military cargo ships in the United States have been stuck in the Baltimore Francis Scott Key Bridge collapse incident.

The Algol-class ships SS Antares and SS Denebola, known for their high speed and cargo capacity, are among those stuck. All ship movements were suspended in the Port of Baltimore, along with two more reserve sealift ships, when the bridge collapsed.

Six construction workers tragically lost their lives in the tragic incident; two others were rescued, one of whom is currently hospitalised. The heavily damaged cargo ship Dali collided with the bridge and is still stuck.

The crew’s mayday call spurred immediate action that prevented an additional disaster, but it’s unclear when the waterway will be cleared and the bridge will be repaired.

President Joe Biden has promised full government assistance for the bridge renovation, underlining the importance of resuming operations at the vital port.

Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg highlighted the port’s importance to the US economy and the necessity of reopening the channels as soon as possible.

The stranded vessels, SS Antares and SS Denebola are part of the Ready Reserve Force (RRF) fleet administered by the Maritime Administration. Critical to military operations, these vessels go through an activation process that usually lasts five to ten days.

With top speeds of up to 33 knots, the Algol-class ships—first constructed in the 1970s—outperform traditional cargo ships by a wide margin.

However, concerns about their age and the difficulty of maintaining their Cold War-era steam propulsion systems exist. The Biden administration emphasizes rebuilding the navigation channel to limit economic consequences and maintain emergency preparation.

The incident has consequences for marine operations and national security, even though its immediate impacts are felt in Baltimore’s inner harbour.

The unfortunate circumstances of the stranded ships highlight how critical resilient infrastructure is and how the marine industry needs to continue modernising.

Reference: TWZ

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Marine Insight News Network is a premier source for up-to-date, comprehensive, and insightful coverage of the maritime industry. Dedicated to offering the latest news, trends, and analyses in shipping, marine technology, regulations, and global maritime affairs, Marine Insight News Network prides itself on delivering accurate, engaging, and relevant information.

About Author

Marine Insight News Network is a premier source for up-to-date, comprehensive, and insightful coverage of the maritime industry. Dedicated to offering the latest news, trends, and analyses in shipping, marine technology, regulations, and global maritime affairs, Marine Insight News Network prides itself on delivering accurate, engaging, and relevant information.

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